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fixing date 2018-10-24 17:30:00 US/Pacific

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fixing date 2018-10-19 15:15:00 US/Pacific

fixing date 2018-10-19 16:20:00 US/Pacific

4 meetings

Title:
Rewiring the Northwest’s Energy Infrastructure
Date:
October 19th
3:15 PM (1.1 hour)
Location:
Engineering Building
Portland
Abstract:

IEEE TEMS Oregon section presents in collaboration with Engineering & Technology Management (ETM) Department at Maseeh College of Engineering and Computer Science   “Distinguished Speaker Series, Fall 2018”

Title:
OR MTT-ED Chapter Meeting
Date:
October 23rd
6:40 PM (1.8 hours)
Location:
Engineering Building
Portland
Abstract:

In days of old, microwave design was done using laborious hand calculations coupled with intuition and “cut and try” prototyping methods; the results were, and remain, impressive in their performance and their long-lasting impact on modern communication systems.

 

The 1980’s saw the advent of a number of commercial computer-based products for analyzing and simulating the behavior of electromagnetic structures, with the goal of easing and speeding the EM design task. Those first tools were able to handle structures of very limited complexity; they were difficult to use; and they were expensive. Fast-forward to 2018: Today we have a wide selection of such tools which are able to handle structures of considerably greater complexity than their earlier cousins, but so-called “big iron” EM tools can still be a) relatively difficult to use and b) typically quite expensive. (Has anyone priced an HFSS or Ansoft simulator seat recently?)

 

One technique the microwave community has used for many years is that of Mechanical Scale Modeling (“MSM”) in which electrically functional 3D-mechanical-scaled models of EM structures are used to predict the performance of the much smaller structures ultimately built into PCBs and hybrids. Typically used for relatively simple functional blocks, the technique is essentially an analog simulator that gives one the ability to quickly, accurately, and quite inexpensively develop microwave components using larger, more tractable dimensions and easier-to-measure scaled-down frequencies.

 

An interesting aspect of the MSM approach is that it can be applied to a broader set of problems than simple microwave component design. In particular, the author has found it to be a useful, inexpensive, and relatively quick-turn tool for a variety of PCB- and IC-related design tasks, including package modeling, inductor design, and even on-chip IC-level interconnect analysis. Although the author’s original work was done in the 1980’s, he has found the technique to be useful even up to the present day – particularly in budget-constrained environments.

 

This talk will focus primarily on the author’s experiences with the MSM technique as applied to IC and package modeling, including a brief review of the theoretical underpinnings of the method; its limitations; actual hardware models; and measurement techniques and test results. As time permits, we may also take a brief look at several “Lessons learned along the way” relating to the design and use of some familiar transmission line structures.

* This talk is an extension of Prof. Rick Campbell’s IEEE MTT Section
seminar of last spring (2018), in which he described techniques and
results using frequency scaling in the design of RF circuitry.

Title:
Industry Applications - Overview of Rail Electrification: DC Traction Power Substations
Date:
October 24th
5:30 PM (3 hours)
Location:
Siemens
Tualatin
Cost:
Admission fee may apply
Abstract:

The officers of the Oregon/SW Washington Chapter invite you to join us Wednesday evening, October 24, 2018, for our Industry Application Society dinner, meeting, presentation and factory tour.  We appreciate the support of all who attend our dinners and presentations.  We will be meeting this month at the Siemens facility in Tualatin, 20393 SW Avery Ct., 97062. This location is easy to access by car from I-5 and parking is FREE.  

The cost will be for The Original Honey Baked Ham, Double Cheddar Macaroni & Cheese, Broccoli Bacon Bliss, Cheesy Potatoes Au Gratin, Kings Hawaiian Rolls. Please let us know of any dietary restrictions when you register.  There is no charge to attend the presentation only.  Our IAS Chapter always offers free dinners for local PSU, OSU, George Fox, U of P, OIT and WSUV Electrical Engineering Students who attend our meetings. This is an excellent networking opportunity for students as our meetings are attended by many professionals in consulting, industrial engineering and electrical equipment manufacturing.

Title:
Face Tracking with ROS 2
Date:
November 13th
6:30 PM (2 hours)
Location:
Axiom
Beraverton
Abstract:

ROS 1 uses a custom serialization format, a custom transport protocol and a custom central discovery mechanism. Maintaining custom infrastructure is expensive. To mitigate ROS 2 uses the DDS (Data Distribution Service) and RTPS (Real Time Publish Subscribe) standard protocols. To gain an understanding of ROS 2 and its capabilities Robert Adams installed it on a Raspberry Pi.

To test ROS2, a face tracking robot was built out of two Raspberry Pi 3s and a laptop. Incorporating a camera node, a PWM control node, an image processing node, and a tracking node, the distributed ROS2 system watches for and points the camera at faces.. This presentation will present an overview of the current state of ROS2 (architecture and code) and then delve into the practical aspects of building a robot system with ROS2 by demonstrating the face tracking robot and its implementation.

4 meetings. Generated Friday, October 19 2018, at 7:09:44 AM. All times America/Los_Angeles